North Korea life vs. life in the United States

This morning I read an article about life in North Korea.  I found it disturbing.  It spoke about imprisonment and life in general.  Below is an out take of the article:

All the fanciful and funny myths about North Korea’s dictators cover up a disturbing truth, however: Some 154,000 North Koreans live in prison camps, according to South Korean government estimates. (Other international bodies put the number at closer to 200,000). There are six camps, surrounded by electrified barbed wire. Two camps allow for some “rehabilitation” and release of prisoners, according to “Escape from Camp 14: One Man’s Remarkable Odyssey from North Korea to Freedom in the West” (Viking, 2012). The rest are prisons for life.

“Escape from Camp 14″ tells the story of Shin Dong-hyuk, the only person known to have escaped from one of these camps and to have made it to the outside world. Shin was born in the camp; his father was imprisoned because his brother had abandoned North Korea for South Korea decades earlier.

Torture, malnutrition, slave labor and public execution are ways of life in the camps, which are known from satellite imagery. An Amnesty International report in 2011 estimated that 40 percent of camp prisoners die of malnutrition.

This is really sad and to think that people in North Korea know this as the norm.  The children there think that eating bark off trees is a normal thing throughout the world.  The teachers and children that go to school learn of nothing but North Korea and their accomplishments but the real reason they go to school is to be fed.

Below is some information concerning prisons here in America.  You will see that we have far more people in prison than necessary.  You see we put people in prison for drug possession and the intent to distribute.  This is really unnecessary.  Why should the American Taxpayer pay for such a thing.  These people if anything should be placed on house arrest and forced to find employment to pay their own way.  Even if it is working on farms.

I know this is controversial but I really don’t think that people should be placed in prison for marijuana possession or the intent to distribute.  This is a whole area that most people would not agree with but it is a non violent crime and when compared to alcohol effects you will find that marijuana is far less impairing.  The prohibition of marijuana is really silly.  We are dooming our young with a felony on their record just for trying out the drug.  Do you have any idea how hard it is to get a job with a felony on your record?  And if you really sit down and think of it.  How many people can say with all honesty they haven’t tried marijuana?  Most people that say they haven’t are liars.  The difference is that the ones that tried it just didn’t get caught.

Incarceration in the United States is one of the main forms of punishment, rehabilitation, or both for the commission of felony and other offenses. The United States has the highest documented incarceration rate in the world. At year-end 2009, it was 743 adults incarcerated per 100,000 population.[4][7][8][9][10]

According to the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), 2,266,800 adults were incarcerated in U.S. federal and state prisons, and county jails at year-end 2010 – about 0.7% of adults in the U.S. resident population.[7] Additionally, 4,933,667 adults at year-end 2009 were on probation or on parole.[4] In total, 7,225,800 adults were under correctional supervision (probation, parole, jail, or prison) in 2009 – about 3.1% of adults in the U.S. resident population.[3][4][11]

In addition, there were 70,792 juveniles in juvenile detention in 2010

I would like to thank Wikipedia for the above information.  As you can see we imprison more of our population than North Korea.  The conditions in prison here in the United States are better but the numbers are staggering.  So once again just something to think about.